John Ransom's Diary

Andersonville

by John Ransom

Audiobook

0 of 1 copy available

Place a hold Listen to a sample Listen to a sample

This book is an extraordinary day-to-day documentary of the Civil War's most infamous Confederate prison, Camp Sumter, better known as Andersonville. Here thirteen thousand wretched Union prisoners died within barely fourteen months, from starvation, scurvy, and other diseases that spread through the camp. There was little shelter but makeshift tents; little in the way of blankets, warm clothing, or even shoes; and a scarcity of food and fresh water. Often they were forced to sleep on the muddy ground in very crowded conditions.

While the deplorable conditions bear witness to man's inhumanity to man, they also are witness to one man's undaunted spirit to survive to tell the dreadful tale—and tell it he did.


Expand title description text
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781483081748
  • File size: 247934 KB
  • Release date: November 9, 2004
  • Duration: 08:35:54

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781483081748
  • File size: 247934 KB
  • Release date: November 9, 2004
  • Duration: 08:35:54
  • Number of parts: 8


Loading

0 of 1 copy available

Available formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

subjects

History Nonfiction

Languages

English

Levels

Text Difficulty: 9-12

This book is an extraordinary day-to-day documentary of the Civil War's most infamous Confederate prison, Camp Sumter, better known as Andersonville. Here thirteen thousand wretched Union prisoners died within barely fourteen months, from starvation, scurvy, and other diseases that spread through the camp. There was little shelter but makeshift tents; little in the way of blankets, warm clothing, or even shoes; and a scarcity of food and fresh water. Often they were forced to sleep on the muddy ground in very crowded conditions.

While the deplorable conditions bear witness to man's inhumanity to man, they also are witness to one man's undaunted spirit to survive to tell the dreadful tale—and tell it he did.


Expand title description text